Confronting the Number One Challenge to New and Existing Self-published Authors

If you were to ask several new self-published authors what has been their number one challenge since the release of their books, no doubt you will get the same response over and over again.  No matter how they choose to phrase the initial lack of book exposure and visibility, it all amounts to the same answer; difficulty in getting people to read and review their books.

Speaking from first-hand experience, I’ve had an extremely difficult time myself (with all my books).  I sell about a handful of different titles every month.  But for some reason, I fail to get any type of responses or feedback at all, let alone genuine book reviews (on Amazon or anywhere else).

I know and understand how prevalent a problem a lack of book reviews can be on Amazon.  For the most part, self-published authors typically hope to become Amazon best-sellers.  Yes, most of us understand that Amazon is not the only viable resource available to indie authors.  But many of us still find ourselves relying on our Amazon status and exposure, as a way to measure readership success.  On Amazon, this status is indicated by book reviews (or a lack of them).

A Question to Readers

This article post is part of my “Ask An Author” series that I promote on my www.charmbaker.com website. My statements address what I believe to be the number one challenge to new and existing self-published authors.  Unfortunately, I can’t provide the remedy or solution to this challenging problem that is common among self-published authors. I don’t have the answer. I do, however, believe that the readers out there in cyberspace can truly help articulate what prompts them to leave a book review.  So my question to readers is:

GOOD OR BAD, WHAT MAKES A READER DECIDE

TO LEAVE A BOOK REVIEW?

I’ve personally engaged in a number of different book marketing activities over the years.  With each new release, I managed to improve on, and step up my marketing and promotional practices, with little to no results.  In some instances, I tried pre-marketing and promotion, before a title was even released, but in spite of any book sales obtained, still no one left reviews.  I’m more than willing to accept the possibility that the problem is somewhere in my actual writing, but how on earth will I know, unless I ever get reader feedback?

If you’d like respond to this article post, or have something in general to add, please add your comment below. You can also respond in the  QUORA forum, along with these related questions.

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